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EXS290 Research Guide

This guide was created for students taking EXS290

Search Strategies

The following video will help you create a search strategy using Boolean logic, nesting, and phrase searching:

Science Direct

Search tips:

Science Direct is a scientific database that provides access to Elsevier publications including peer-reviewed journals, books and reference works.

Phrase searching: Use double quotes - example: "pulmonary embolism" 

For an exact match, use brackets - example: {acute myocardial infarction}

Truncation: Use an asterisk - example: adoles* will retrieve the words adolescent, adolescents or adolescence.  

Boolean: Use Boolean Operators for more precise searching within your search statements or between advanced search boxes. (Case does matter!)

Example: (exercise OR "physical activity") AND obesity

Full-text: Articles that are full-text will be indicated with a green dot in your search results and either "full text access" or "open access". 

Advanced Search: Narrow your search results to include just "Review Articles" and "Research Articles" under Article Types on the search page. 

For more help on searching ScienceDirect, click on the link below:

How do I use the Advanced Search in Science Direct?

 

EBSCO Databases

Search Tips:

EBSCO databases include Academic Search Premier, PsycINFO, Medline, CINAHL and many more. To search multiple EBSCO databases at one time**, look for the "Choose Databases" link above the search box upon entering any EBSCO database:

**Note: searching multiple EBSCO databases at a time limits searching features including database specific controlled vocabulary and limiting tools. You will achieve more specific, relevant results by searching databases individually. 

Phrase searching: Use double quotes - example: "pulmonary embolism" 

Truncation: Use an asterisk - example: adoles* will retrieve the words adolescent, adolescents or adolescence.

Boolean: Use Boolean Operators for more precise searching within your search statements or between advanced search boxes. (Case does not matter!)

Example: (exercise OR "physical activity") AND obesity

Full-text: To limit results to just those articles that are available full-text, check the 'Full Text' box on the left side of the screen after you run your initial search.

Advanced Search: For more precise searching, choose Advanced Search. This will allow you to choose the 'fields' you want to search and precisely map out your search strategy.

For more help on searching EBSCO, click on the link below:

EBSCO Basic Searching Tutorial

EBSCO Advanced Searching Tutorial

Academic OneFile

Search Tips: 

Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Collection and Academic OneFile are examples of Gale databases. Both databases index a variety of both popular and scholarly sources. When searching for scholarly articles, view the Academic Journal results or limit to 'peer-reviewed journals'. Look for these options on the right side column of the screen once you run a search.

Phrase searching: Use double quotes - example: "pulmonary embolism" 

Truncation: Use an asterisk - example: adoles* will retrieve the words adolescent, adolescents or adolescence.

Boolean: Use Boolean Operators for more precise searching within your search statements or between advanced search boxes. (Case does not matter!)

Example: (exercise OR "physical activity") AND obesity

Full-text: To limit results to just those articles that are available full-text, check the 'only full text' box on the right side of the screen after you run your initial search.

Advanced Search: For more precise searching, choose Advanced Search. This will allow you to choose the 'fields' you want to search and precisely map out your search strategy.

For more help on searching Gale databases, click on the link below:

Basic Search

PubMed

Search tips:

PubMed uses a complex search algorithm for retrieving search results including automatic term mapping and automatic explosion which interprets and matches your search terms to MeSH headings while using appropriate keywords and incorporation of Boolean operators. Traditional search techniques (Boolean, nesting, phrase searching, etc.) are optional when searching PubMed.

Phrase searching: PubMed automatically finds phrases for you - using quotes is optional.

Truncation: Pubmed will automatically look for variations of a root word so truncation is optional. If you choose to use truncation, use and asterisk (*).

Boolean: Pubmed automatically adds AND in between your concepts. However, it is recommended to use OR between like terms otherwise, PubMed will automatically add AND. 

Full-text: To limit results to just those articles that are freely accessible, choose "Free full text".

Advanced Search: To map out a precise search strategy in PubMed, choose "Advanced" linked under the search box.

***For more help on searching PubMed, visit the PubMed User Guide ***